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Family of patient at Floralies LaSalle long-term care facility taking action

Click to play video: 'Family of disabled woman at Floralies LaSalle long-term care facility fed up' Family of disabled woman at Floralies LaSalle long-term care facility fed up
WATCH: It's been four weeks since the province placed the Floralies long-term care residences under trusteeship, following allegations of mistreatment and several deaths due to a bacterial outbreak. But one family is not willing to wait for services to improve under the regional health authority's management. As Olivia O'Malley reports, they are preparing to move their loved one to another facility.

It’s been four weeks since the province placed the Floralies long-term care residences under trusteeship, and the province’s investigation into mistreatment complaints is still ongoing.

Since then, Brigitte Lavoie hoped walking into Floralies LaSalle would be different, but after seeing that her sister’s living conditions are still deplorable, she is taking action on her own.

“I was so pissed off because I arrive at the room of my sister, she still has s–t in the bed. Her feet again were dirty,” said Lavoie.

Read more: Montreal long-term care homes placed under trusteeship amid investigation into allegations

On Thursday Lavoie filmed at least three spiders above her sister’s bed. She says they’ve been there for weeks.

Lavoie’s older sibling Sophie Lavoie is intellectually disabled and incontinent. She was told she would be at Floralies LaSalle temporarily, a year and a half ago.

“In the one year and a half, she goes this way since she’s here. So it’s very crazy,” said Lavoie.

Lavoie says she has filed multiple mistreatment complaints with the regional health authority. After she says they’ve failed to take action, Lavoie is moving her sister herself.

“It’s very hard, you know? Now, finally, we found a new place for her, so she’s going to move tomorrow. Thank God,” said Lavoie.

Read more: Quebec investigating allegations of mistreatment, negligence at Montreal long-term care homes

Patients rights advocate Paul Brunet says with 4,000-plus people on CHSLD waiting lists, not every patient can be transferred right away.

“You need some patience and you need to maybe negotiate with the owner, the operator, especially in the private sector, if services are not being rendered at the level that they should be rendered,” said Brunet.

He says moving to another long-term care home doesn’t guarantee an improvement in services — something Lavoie knows.

“It’s not because we changed my sister to another place that it’s going to be better,” she told Global News.

In a statement to Global News, the regional health authority says its teams are working closely with Floralies LaSalle and Lachine to resume management of the facilities once the situation has stabilized, adding that in the meantime, its priority is to make decisions to ensure the health and safety of residents.

Quebec’s Ministry of Health and Social Services did not reply to Global News’ request for comment by deadline.

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